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Build Instructions

Revision as of 18:03, 16 January 2016 by AdminTeam (talk | contribs) (Created page with "To build Console OS, we recommend matching our build environment. Today we rely on Ubuntu 15.10 on a machine with a 64-bit processor. Building with a 32-bit version of Ubuntu...")

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To build Console OS, we recommend matching our build environment. Today we rely on Ubuntu 15.10 on a machine with a 64-bit processor. Building with a 32-bit version of Ubuntu is unlikely to work.

More RAM is better - at least 4GB should be used. If building with multiple cores, you should plan on at least 8GB of RAM, and a swap file (virtual memory). For faster build times, we also encourage you to use an solid-state drive - building Android with a traditional hard disk has become very slow.

Building Console OS on OS X is planned and possible, but not supported at this time.

Installing Packages

  • For starters, run Ubuntu Software Update until it reports no updates available.
  • Then, run the following commands to add support for multi-arch building, and add additional required build components:
    • sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386
    • sudo apt-get update
    • sudo apt-get install bison g++-multilib git gperf libxml2-utils dos2unix zlib1g:i386

Enabling CCache

  • We recommend enabling ccache - It is not required, but will speed up incremental builds significantly.
    • Create a file ~/.bashrc (or edit it, if it isn't there already)
    • Edit the file and add the following:
      • export USE_CCACHE=1
    • If you are using a single disk drive, you don't need to define the ccache directory - however if you have multiple drives, moving the ccache to another drive may be beneficial. To do so, edit the .bashrc file to add the following
    • export CCACHE_DIR= (insert path here)

Installing OpenJDK Android versions prior to Lollipop were built using the Sun/Oracle JDK. However, Google switched to OpenJDK for Lollipop, which is easier to install and set up.